Posted 23 May 2011, 10:00 am EDT

The Arts Documentaries

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A number of people have asked me about the arts documentaries…how classes are selected, how the documentaries are made, why they aren’t longer, why there hasn't been one about the Upper School arts programs this year, and how come there aren’t more of them? I’m glad that people are interested in and enjoying these documentaries, so I thought I would address all of these questions today.

The current plan is for there to be three arts documentaries each year, one for each division of the School, alternating between visual and performing arts. So, for example, last year the Lower School arts documentary focused on the Native American Festival, a performing arts production, while the Upper School arts documentary focused on printmaking, a visual arts project. (There was no Middle School arts documentary last year as "The Arts" section was added to Sine Charta in March there simply wasn't the time to produce one.) This year the Lower School arts documentary focused on the Grade One Circus Train, a visual arts project. (I do plan to move around different grades within each division, although that may not always be possible or practical.) The Middle School arts documentary this year focused on the Middle School Orchestra (performing arts) and the Upper School documentary will focus on the Theatre IV one-act plays (performing arts) directed, and in some cases written, by graduating seniors. Next year the Lower School video will be about the performing arts, and the Middle and Upper School videos will be about ...
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Posted 16 May 2011, 8:00 am EDT

When a producer calls...

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Last week I received three media calls related to the Forbes.com article, from last year, that ranked schools. All three were from broadcast outlets: two from domestic broadcasters and one from a German broadcast company. It would be difficult to say whether I was more surprised by calls generated by an article that is over one year old or by the fact that none of the broadcasters were from New York City. Perhaps most surprising of all was that all three calls arrived in the same week, which made me wonder why, with everything that is going on in the world, broadcasters were still trolling through last year’s news. The arc of the life of any particular media story depends on a number of factors. Perhaps most important would be how it first breaks. A story that breaks in a respected print outlet is pretty much guaranteed to be picked up by what I still refer to as the “wire services” and the appearance of such a story on AP, AFP, Reuters, or similar means that a great number of the print media will run with the story simply because they have paid for it already. If they have the column inches, or Web space, available then the story will run. Other stories take on a life of their own, regardless of how they first broke. Several years ago a story broke about a sound that could be heard only by young people. This was developed by an Englishman who wanted to keep ...
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Posted 09 May 2011, 11:00 am EDT

Spring is in the air

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The dull roots, having been stirred with spring rain, have finally produced brilliant flowers and bright green growth on trees. As it is with nature, so it is on Sine Charta where there is much that is new to be found. On this Web site you may now find:
  • Grade One Circus Train – a new visual arts documentary that allows you to follow the students in Bruce Edelstein’s class as they create wooden sculptures of things they have seen, or would like to see, in a circus. It’s a wonderful opportunity to see what happens in the studio and to hear what the students think of their experience...an honor generally reserved for the students and teachers. Trinity students are thoughtful and articulate and it is fascinating to hear what they have to say.
  • Middle School Orchestra – a new performing arts documentary that follows the progress of the orchestra as it prepares for a concert in January 2011. Watching the students work with their conductor and teacher, Steven Rochen, provides rare insight into the hard work, dedication, and, as one student describes it, “nerve-racking,” effort it takes to prepare for a concert. Footage (well, of a digital nature) from weeks of rehearsal is combined with interviews with students to put together a complete picture of the experience.
  • E-book edition of the spring 2011 Trinity Per Saecula. For those of you with an iPad, iPhone, Kindle, ...
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ABOUT THE
AUTHOR

Kevin D. Ramsey Kevin D. Ramsey Director of Communications

Kevin is the director of communications at Trinity School and is responsible for producing the annual report, calendar, admissions marketing materials, "Trinity Per Saecula," and "Sine Charta." He has worked at Trinity since November 1995.